Hibiscus Sabdariffa

Hibiscus Sabdariffa

Hibiscus sabdariffa is commonly named as “red sorrel” or “roselle”. It is a medicinal plant. Roselle is rich in organic acids including citric, malic, tartaric and allo-hydroxycitric acids. The plant is also known for its Beta carotene, vitamin C, protein and total sugar. Roselle, having various medically important compounds called photochemical, is well known for its nutritional and medicinal properties.  It is valued for its mild laxative affect.

Roselle is also known for its antibacterial, antifungal and anti-parasitic actions. Different extracts from Roselle plays a crucial role in treating different medical problems including many cardiovascular disorders, disease and cancer. The plant also act as an anti-oxidant and used in obesity management.

Peer Reviewed Research

  1. Singh P, Khan M, Hailemariam H. Nutritional and health importance of Hibiscus sabdariffa : a review and indication for research needs. J Nutr Health Food Eng. 2017;6(5):125-128. DOI: 10.15406/jnhfe.2017.06.00212
  2. Abbas M, Shirin M, Patricia K, et al. The effect of Hibiscus sabdariffaon lipid profile, creatinine, and serum electrolytes: a randomized clinical trial. International scholarly research network. ISRN gastroenterology. 2011;2011(2011):1‒4.
  3. Arvind M, Alka C. Hibiscus Sabdariffa L a rich source of secondary metabolites. 2011;6(1):1.
  4. Okereke CN, Iroka FC, Chukwuma MO. Phytochemical analysis and medicinal uses of Hibiscus sabdariffa. International Journal of Herbal Medicine. 2015;2(6):16‒19.
  5. Aziz, Eman E, Nadia Gad, et al. Effect of cobalt and nickel on plant growth, yield and flavonoids content of Hibiscus sabdariffa Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences. 2007;1(2):73‒78.
  6. Mahadevan, Shivali KN, Pradeep. Hibiscus sabdariffa L- An overview. Natural Product Radiance. 2009;8(1):77‒83.
  7. Lin Tzu-Li, Lin Hui-Hsuan, Chen Chang-Che, et al. Hibiscus sabdariffaextract reduces serum cholesterol in men and women. Nutrition Research. 2007;27(3):140‒145.
  8. Sandeep G, Raghuveer I, Prabodh CS, et al. Hypolipidemic effect of ethanolic extract from the leaves of Hibiscus sabdariffa in hyperlipidemic rats. Acta poloniae pharmaceutical drug research. 2010;67(2):179‒184.
  9. Gurrola-Diaz CM, Garcia-Lopez PM, Sanchez-Enriquez S, et al. Effects of Hibiscus sabdariffaextract powder and preventive treatment (diet) on the lipid profiles of patients with metabolic syndrome (MeSy). 2010;17(7):500‒505.
  10. Hassan Mozaffari-Khosravi, Beman-Ali Jalali-Khanabadi, Mohammad Afkhami-Ardekani, et al. Effects of Sour Tea (Hibiscus sabdariffa) on Lipid Profile and Lipoproteins in Patients with Type II Diabetes. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2009;15(8):899‒903.
  11. Herrera-Arellano A, Miranda-Sanchez J, Avila-Castro P, et al. Clinical effects produced by a standardized herbal medicinal product of Hibiscus sabdariffaon patients with hypertension. A randomized, double-blind, lisinopril-controlled clinical trial. Planta Med. 2007;73(1):6‒12.
  12. Penq CH, Chyau CC, Chan KC, et al. Hibiscus sabdariffa polyphenolic extract inhibits hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and glycation-oxidative stress while improving insulin resistance. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 2011;59(18):9901‒9909.
  13. Adisakwattana S, Ruengsamran T, Kampa P, et al. In vitro inhibitory effects of plant-based foods and their combinations on intestinal ?-glucosidase and pancreatic ?- amylase. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2012;12(1):110.
  14. Hatil Hashim El Kamali, Moneer Fathi Mohammed. Antibacterial activity of Hibiscus sabdariffa, Acacia seyal var. seyal and Sphaeranthussuaveolens var. suaveolens against upper respiratory tract pathogens. Sudan JMS1. 2006;(2):121‒126.
  15. Afolabi OC, Ogunsola FT, Coker AO. Susceptibility of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans to extracts of Garcinia kolaHibiscus sabdariffa, and Solanum americanumThe West African Journal of Medicine. 2008;27(4):230‒233.
  16. Yin MC, Chao CY. Anti-Campylobacter, anti-aerobic, and anti-oxidative effects of roselle calyx extract and protocatechuic acid in ground beef. International Journal of Food Microbiology. 2008;127(1‒2):73‒77.
  17. Augustine O Olusola. Evaluation of the Antioxidant Effects of Hibiscus Sabdariffacalyx extracts on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine-induced oxidative damage in rabbits. Webmed Central. 2011;2(10):WMC002283.
  18. Okasha MAM, Abubakar MS, Bako IG. Study of the effect of aqueous Hibiscus Sabdariffa Linn seed extract on serum prolactin level of lactating female Albino Rats. European Journal of Scientific Research. 2008;22(4):575‒583.
  19. Bako IG, Abubakar MS, Mabrouk MA, et al. Lactogenic study of the effect of ethyl-acetate fraction of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn (Malvaceae) seed on serum prolactin level in lactating albino rats. Advance Journal of Food Science & Technology. 2014;6(3):292‒296.
  20. Da-Costa-Rocha I, Bonnlaender B, Sievers H, et al. Hibiscus sabdariffa – A phytochemical and pharmacological review. Food Chemistry. 2014;165:424‒443.

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