Liquorice Root

Liquorice Root

Liquorice root, which is considered one of the world’s oldest herbal remedies, comes from the root of the liquorice plant (Glycyrrhiza glabra). Medicinal use of liquorice dates back to ancient Egypt, where the root was made into a sweet drink for pharaohs. Today, many people utilize licorice root to treat ailments like indigestion, heartburn, acid reflux, hot flashes, coughs, and bacterial and viral infections. Additionally, liquorice tea is said to soothe sore throats. 

While it contains hundreds of plant compounds, liquorice root’s primary active compound is glycyrrhizin. Glycyrrhizin is responsible for the root’s sweet taste, as well as its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties.

Peer Reviewed Research

  1. Wang L, Yang R, Yuan B, Liu Y, Liu C. The antiviral and antimicrobial activities of licorice, a widely-used Chinese herb. Acta Pharm Sin B. 2015;5(4):310-315. doi:10.1016/j.apsb.2015.05.005
  2. Wang XR, Hao HG, Chu L. Glycyrrhizin inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory mediator production in endometrial epithelial cells. Microb Pathog. 2017 Aug;109:110-113. doi: 10.1016/j.micpath.2017.05.032. Epub 2017 May 25. PMID: 28552807.
  3. Yehuda I, Madar Z, Leikin-Frenkel A, Tamir S. Glabridin, an isoflavan from licorice root, downregulates iNOS expression and activity under high-glucose stress and inflammation. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015 Jun;59(6):1041-52. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201400876. Epub 2015 May 3. PMID: 25737160.
  4. Yang R, Yuan BC, Ma YS, Zhou S, Liu Y. The anti-inflammatory activity of licorice, a widely used Chinese herb. Pharm Biol. 2017 Dec;55(1):5-18. doi: 10.1080/13880209.2016.1225775. Epub 2016 Sep 21. PMID: 27650551; PMCID: PMC7012004.
  5. Saeedi M, Morteza-Semnani K, Ghoreishi MR. The treatment of atopic dermatitis with licorice gel. J Dermatolog Treat. 2003 Sep;14(3):153-7. doi: 10.1080/09546630310014369. PMID: 14522625.
  6. Raveendra KR, Jayachandra, Srinivasa V, Sushma KR, Allan JJ, Goudar KS, Shivaprasad HN, Venkateshwarlu K, Geetharani P, Sushma G, Agarwal A. An Extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra (GutGard) Alleviates Symptoms of Functional Dyspepsia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012;2012:216970. doi: 10.1155/2012/216970. Epub 2011 Jun 16. PMID: 21747893; PMCID: PMC3123991.
  7. Di Pierro F, Gatti M, Rapacioli G, Ivaldi L. Outcomes in patients with nonerosive reflux disease treated with a proton pump inhibitor and alginic acid ± glycyrrhetinic acid and anthocyanosides. Clin Exp Gastroenterol. 2013;6:27-33. doi: 10.2147/CEG.S42512. Epub 2013 Mar 27. PMID: 23569394; PMCID: PMC3615700.
  8. Setright, R. (2017). Prevention of symptoms of gastric irritation (GERD) using two herbal formulas: An observational study. Journal of the Australian Traditional-Medicine Society, 23(2), 68–71. https://search.informit.org/doi/10.3316/informit.950298610899394

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